Following HaMoked's appeal: The military removes six concrete blocks from the main entryway to Nil'in village in the Ramallah district המוקד להגנת הפרט
عر HE wheel chair icon
כפתור חיפוש
תמונה ללא תיאור
07.07.2010
Following HaMoked's appeal: The military removes six concrete blocks from the main entryway to Nil'in village in the Ramallah district
Following HaMoked's appeal: The military removes six concrete blocks from the main entryway to Nil'in village in the Ramallah district
On July 6, 2008, the military imposed a curfew on Nil'in. At the start of the curfew, soldiers barricaded the main entryway to the village with six concrete blocks. Four days later, the curfew was lifted and the military left the area, leaving the six massive concrete blocks at the village entrance. The blocks were positioned in a manner that prevented direct traffic of vehicles into and out of the village, transforming the road into a narrow single-lane path.

The roadblock led to daily traffic jams and increased chances of accidents in the busy intersection, which serves not only the 5,000 residents of Nil'in, but also 15,000 residents of the adjoining villages – Al Midya, Shuqba, Qibya and Shabtin – who also travel daily through the Nil'in entryway. Furthermore, the gas depot at the end of the village feeds gas deployments throughout the north and centre regions of the West Bank. The loaded gas tanker trucks also travel back and forth through the Nil'in entryway, and were encumbered by the roadblock.

On February 14, 2010, following a request of the head council of Nil'in, Mr. Aiman Sa'id Ibrahim Naf'a, HaMoked appealed to the legal advisor of the West Bank, to have the concrete blocks removed and clear the road for the regular flow of traffic. In want of the legal advisor's reply, HaMoked sent three additional reminders, in March, April and May.  

On June 14, 2010, the military removed the six concrete blocks from the village entrance, enabling, after some two years, the local residents to re-establish their daily routines, without time wasted daily in unnecessary traffic jams and needless risk to life and property.

On July 5, 2010, three weeks after the roadblock removal, HaMoked received the legal advisor's reply, stating that the concrete blocks were positioned due to "an imperative security need" which is reviewed occasionally, and that "currently, the concrete blocks cannot be removed"

To date, the Nil'in entryway is open to traffic.
Print Print
Share
On July 6, 2008, the military imposed a curfew on Nil'in. At the start of the curfew, soldiers barricaded the main entryway to the village with six concrete blocks. Four days later, the curfew was lifted and the military left the area, leaving the six massive concrete blocks at the village entrance. The blocks were positioned in a manner that prevented direct traffic of vehicles into and out of the village, transforming the road into a narrow single-lane path.

The roadblock led to daily traffic jams and increased chances of accidents in the busy intersection, which serves not only the 5,000 residents of Nil'in, but also 15,000 residents of the adjoining villages – Al Midya, Shuqba, Qibya and Shabtin – who also travel daily through the Nil'in entryway. Furthermore, the gas depot at the end of the village feeds gas deployments throughout the north and centre regions of the West Bank. The loaded gas tanker trucks also travel back and forth through the Nil'in entryway, and were encumbered by the roadblock.

On February 14, 2010, following a request of the head council of Nil'in, Mr. Aiman Sa'id Ibrahim Naf'a, HaMoked appealed to the legal advisor of the West Bank, to have the concrete blocks removed and clear the road for the regular flow of traffic. In want of the legal advisor's reply, HaMoked sent three additional reminders, in March, April and May.  

On June 14, 2010, the military removed the six concrete blocks from the village entrance, enabling, after some two years, the local residents to re-establish their daily routines, without time wasted daily in unnecessary traffic jams and needless risk to life and property.

On July 5, 2010, three weeks after the roadblock removal, HaMoked received the legal advisor's reply, stating that the concrete blocks were positioned due to "an imperative security need" which is reviewed occasionally, and that "currently, the concrete blocks cannot be removed"

To date, the Nil'in entryway is open to traffic.
Related documents
משפט ישראלי - מסמכים אחרים


משפט ישראלי - כתבי בי דין


משפט ישראלי - חקיקה


משפט ישראלי - פסיקה


משפט בינלאומי וזר - מסמכים אחרים


משפט בינלאומי וזר - אמנות וחקיקה


משפט בינלאומי וזר - פסיקה


ספרות - עדכונים


ספרות - פסיקה במבחן


ספרות - ספרים


ספרות - מאמרים


ספרות - שונות


ספרות - דוחות